Session Abstract – PMWC 2020 Silicon Valley


Remote sensors that capture health-related data, from CardioMEMs to the Apple Watch, are increasingly common in the modern healthcare landscape. This session will examine both existing applications of remote sensors that derive actionable clinical insights and the future potential for these tools for precision medicine.

 Session Chair Profile

M.D., M.P.H., Cardiologist and an Assistant Professor, Division of Cardiology, UCSF Health

Biography
Geoff Tison, MD, MPH is a Cardiologist and Assistant Professor at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). His research focuses on cardiovascular prevention, using statistical and machine learning methods to analyze large-scale health data for disease prevention and phenotyping. He obtained formal training in machine learning, statistics, epidemiology and clinical research during his tenure at Johns Hopkins and as a National Institutes of Health T32 scholar. Dr. Tison received MD and MPH degrees from the Johns Hopkins Schools of Medicine and Public Health, completed internal medicine training at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, and fellowships in cardiology, advanced echocardiography and preventive cardiology at UCSF.


 Speaker Profile

M.D., Clinical Professor of Medicine, Stanford; Research Scientist, Google Health

Biography
Dr. McConnell is an MIT-trained bioengineer who completed his MD at Stanford followed by cardiology fellowship and cardiovascular imaging training at Brigham & Women's and Beth Israel Hospitals in Boston. He joined the Stanford faculty in 1998 and remains a Clinical Professor while working nearby at Google Health. He continues part-time clinical activities at Stanford in imaging and Preventive Cardiology and teaching with Stanford Biodesign. He previously directed the Cardiovascular MRI Program and the Preventive Cardiology Clinic in the Stanford Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. His research expertise includes novel MRI and molecular imaging techniques, from mouse to man, to evaluate coronary artery and vascular diseases, including the detection and characterization of atherosclerotic plaque and vascular inflammation. He directed the NIH-funded Multi-Disciplinary Training Program in Cardiovascular Imaging at Stanford (CVIS). He was also the Director of Cardiovascular Health Innovation and led efforts to integrate mobile health technologies to improve the care of patients with or at risk for cardiovascular disease, including PI of the MyHeart Counts mHealth research study.


 Speaker Profile

M.D., Director, Mechanical Circulatory Support and Heart Failure Device Programs, University of California San Francisco

Biography
Liviu Klein, MD, MS, completed his fellowship training in Cardiovascular Epidemiology, Cardiovascular Disease, Advanced Heart Failure and Heart Transplantation, and in Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology at Northwestern Medicine in Chicago. He specializes in caring for patients with heart failure, pulmonary hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias, with a special expertise in cardiac resynchronization therapy, hemodynamic monitoring, heart transplantation and ventricular assist devices. In his research, Klein is developing new technologies for monitoring and treating patients with heart failure and other cardiovascular disease, including those who use ventricular assist devices. Klein has been extensively funded in his research by R01, R21 and SBIR grants from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institutes. At UCSF, Dr. Klein is an Associate Professor of Medicine, and the Director of Cardiology Clinical Research, as well as the Director of the Mechanical Circulatory and Heart Failure Device Programs.


 Speaker Profile

M.D., M.A.S., Associate Chief of Cardiology for Research at UCSF Health

Biography
Greg Marcus is Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), Associate Chief of Cardiology for Research at UCSF Health, and the inaugural Endowed Professor of Atrial Fibrillation Research. He attended medical school at the George Washington University School of medicine and then completed his internship, residency, and served as Chief Medical Resident at Stanford. Subsequently, he completed his general cardiology and cardiac electrophysiology fellowships at UCSF. As part of an NIH-funded career development award, he then completed a Masters in Advanced Studies in Clinical Research at UCSF. In addition to engaging in an active clinical practice dedicated to the diagnosis and treatment of arrhythmias, including caring for patients in the clinic and hospital, performing catheter ablation procedures and implantations of pacemakers and defibrillators, and training cardiology electrophysiology fellows, Dr. Marcus has an active research program. His research is dedicated to understanding the fundamental causes of abnormal heart rhythms, identifying optimal therapeutic approaches for those arrhythmias, understanding the overall health effects of common exposures such as caffeine, alcohol, tobacco smoke, and cannabis, and using technology and wearable sensors to enhance health and the efficiency of patient-oriented research. He is one of the founders and continues to serve as one of the Principal Investigators of the world-wide, internet-based, Health eHeart Study as well as the NIH-funded national infrastructure to facilitate mobile health, called Eureka. He also runs several ongoing single-center and multi-center randomized, prospective trials, and oversees a team of investigators including post-doctoral fellows, clinical research coordinators, statisticians, and data analysts.