Speaker Profile

Ph.D., CSO, Ciscovery Bio

Biography
Jongmin is passionate about identifying cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) and applying CRMs to understand and engineer cellular states. While a postdoc at Caltech, he pioneered the use of barcoded reporters for high-throughput CRM discovery in sea urchin embryos. As an independent PI at Rutgers, his lab focused on developing high-throughput reporter assays: MMOSAIC that enabled high-throughput spatial analysis of cis-regulatory modules in embryos without relying on imaging tools, and GRAMc, a genome-scale reporter assay method for cis-regulatory modules in embryos and cell lines. To extend his passion to improving human health, he co-founded Ciscovery Bio.


Genomic Profiling Showcase:
Ciscovery Bio

Ciscovery Bio is a non-coding biomarker company that discovers and utilizes cis-regulatory modules for drug development and treatment.

Unlocking the Power of the Noncoding Genome
Ciscovery Bio's mission is to empower drug development and treatment by using the most prevalent noncoding genomic biomarkers, cis-regulatory modules. Jongmin will present Ciscovery Bio's core technology for the discovery of cis-regulatory modules and its key applications.

 Session Abstract – PMWC 2022 Silicon Valley

Track 7, June 28-30


The PMWC 2022 Genomic Profiling Showcase will provide a 15 min speaking opportunity for selected companies working with the latest technologies in nucleic acid sequencing such as NGS, providing instrumentation for genomic sequencing, and offering direct to consumer services. These companies will share their innovative products and services to an audience of leading investors, potential clients and partners. The Genomic Profiling Showcase will exhibit the latest innovations in methods and instruments used for DNA/ RNA sequencing to ascertain the genomic and transcriptional profile of a person in order to understand why some people get certain diseases while others do not, or why people react in different ways to the same drug. This information is also being used to develop new ways to diagnose, treat, and prevent diseases, such as cancer.