Session Abstract – PMWC 2020 Silicon Valley


The contribution of gut microbiota to human health and diseases has expanded our insights into how microbial composition and function impacts the human host. Recently, several metabolites produced by gut microbes from dietary metabolism have also been linked to pathologies such as atherosclerosis, hypertension, heart failure, chronic kidney disease, obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. These findings suggested that the gut microbiome functions like an endocrine organ by generating bioactive metabolites that can directly or indirectly impact host physiology. In this talk, I will discuss several newly discovered gut microbial communities and metabolic pathways, including the production of dietary nutrient metabolites and secondary bile acids that appear to participate in the development and progression of cardiometabolic diseases. We will also discuss the gut microbiome as a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of cardiovascular disease, and potential strategies for targeting intestinal microbial processes.

 Session Chair Profile

M.D., Professor in Medicine, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine at CWRU

Biography
W. H. Wilson Tang, MD, is Director of Cleveland Clinic’s Center for Clinical Genomics; Research Director, and staff cardiologist in the Section of Heart Failure and Cardiac Transplantation Medicine in the Sydell and Arnold Miller Family Heart & Vascular Institute at the Cleveland Clinic. Dr. Tang is Professor of Medicine at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University. Dr. Tang is a clinician-scientist interested in clinical translational research, with joint appointments with the Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine and the Genomic Medicine Institute at Cleveland Clinic’s Lerner Research Institute. He leads the Cleveland GeneBank Study as well as the Cleveland Heart and Metabolic Prevention Study to investigate novel mechanisms in the development of heart diseases. Dr. Tang’s current research interests include the role of counter-regulatory mechanisms in the development and progression of heart failure, integrative genomics and epigenetics in cardiomyopathies, and metabolomics in cardio-renal physiology. Dr. Tang is currently the Principal Investigator for the Cleveland Heart Failure Network as part of the National Heart Failure Clinical Research Network for translational clinical trials.