Session Abstract – PMWC 2020 Silicon Valley


Blood/liquid biopsy-based biomarkers for the most accurate early detection of cancer are still in the early phases of development. Before these types of biomarkers/tests can be used in the clinical setting, various clinical and preclinical issues (e.g. detection sensitivity) need to be addressed. This session discusses latest advancements in the development of blood-based biomarkers and describes clinical study programs in which they are implemented, including the limitations and challenges that need to be overcome before the translation of their use for clinical purpose will be a reality.

 Session Chair Profile

M.D., VP of Clinical Development, GRAIL, Inc.

Biography
Anne-Renee Hartman is the Vice President of Clinical Development at GRAIL, Inc. where she is responsible for the design and execution of clinical programs to discover and validate cell-free nucleic acid technology for early detection of cancer. Prior to GRAIL, Anne-Renee was the Senior Vice President of Clinical Development at Myriad Genetics, Inc. At Myriad, Anne-Renee led the development of several commercialized diagnostics in oncology, including hereditary cancer testing, companion diagnostics for PARP therapy, and diagnostic and prognostic assays for melanoma, lung, and prostate cancer. Anne-Renee was previously an Assistant Professor of Medicine at The Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, specializing in breast cancer genetics. She completed her oncology fellowship at Stanford where she helped set up the cancer genetics clinic. Anne-Renee holds a Bachelor’s degree in Molecular Biology from Princeton University, an M.D. from the University of Michigan, and completed her residency in Internal Medicine at the University of Chicago.


 Speaker Profile

M.D., Ph.D., Chairman & Professor, Dept. of Cancer Biology, MD Anderson

Biography
In 2015, Kalluri’s lab at MD Anderson received widespread attention for a discovery that could lead to a blood test that detects pancreatic cancer at an early stage, before it spreads to other organs and becomes too difficult to treat. Kalluri received his PhD in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from the University of Kansas Medical Center and his M.D. degree from Brown University Medical School. In 1997, he moved to Harvard Medical School as an assistant professor of medicine and as a faculty based in the Department of Medicine at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Subsequently, Kalluri was appointed the chief of the Division of Matrix Biology and promoted to professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School.


 Speaker Profile

M.D., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine (Oncology), Stanford

Biography
The major focus of Dr. Alizadeh’s research group is to attain a better understanding of the initiation, maintenance, and progression of lymphoid tumors, and their response to existing and novel therapies toward improving current treatment strategies. In this effort, they employ tools from functional genomics, computational biology, molecular genetics, and mouse models. They hope to apply this knowledge towards the design of clinical trials in the treatment of patients with lymphoma, leukemia, and myeloma.