Q: As a pioneer in high performance architectures for genomic research what are the biggest challenges that you see clients dealing with as they invest in precision medicine initiatives?

A: As precision medicine rapidly transforms the healthcare industry into one that is completely data-driven and evidence-based, a giant data wave is forming and clients are struggling to deploy the necessary infrastructure and technologies to keep pace.

As part of my doctoral work in molecular genetics at Washington University I participated in the first international genome project which took nearly 10 years and billions of dollars to sequence the first human genome. With the arrival of next generation sequencing technologies, we are now able to complete DNA sequencing for a single genome for roughly one thousand dollars and in less than a week’s time. Those cost dynamics will eventually support the expansion of genomics analytics beyond academic research centers and pharmaceutical R&D into clinical settings but not until organizations are equipped to handle the large amount of new data that will be produced on a regular basis.

Q: But precision medicine involves much more than just genomics data. What are the other data sources that we will need to address to support precision medicine?

A: That’s right –multiple studies indicate that an individual’s health is approximately 30% attributable to his/her genomic profile. The largest source of data impacting our health is believed to be associated with factors outside the health system –what we refer to as exogenous data including individual environmental, socio-economic and lifestyle characteristics. When combined with other data sources that are essential to comprehensive precision health including clinical records, labs & imaging; omics/Dx data; and remote monitoring and wearable data, it is easy to understand the magnitude of the challenge.

Q: As you developed a target reference architecture what are the other challenges that you had to consider?

A: The client’s computer platform must be fast, easy to use, affordable, and collaborative. It must accommodate the growing volumes of data which is often dispersed across geographic and organizational boundaries to support collaborative research and care management. It must also support an open framework and the hundreds of applications which are being developed in the areas of genomics, imaging, clinical analytics and artificial intelligence & deep learning. Many of these applications are isolated in functional and operational siloes further inhibiting integration of relevant data sets.

Q: With that in mind what advice do you give to clients who are making strategic investments to modernize their existing capabilities?

A: I look at three key ingredients to building a flexible and sustainable foundation that will support the demands of precision medicine. First, the solution must be defined by software. Even though the infrastructure is built using hardware with chips and processors, and data resides in storage attachments, the ability to operate, orchestrate and organize data is in software, or middleware sitting between hardware and applications. This is what we call software-defined infrastructure (SDI).

Second, any solution needs to follow a defined reference architecture. Our experience with clients has taught us that software capabilities can easily be dictated by underlying hardware building blocks (CPU vs GPU, on-prem vs cloud, x86 vs Power8) and even more so by the hundreds if not thousands of applications it needs to support. Without a consistent framework and roadmap in the form of reference architecture, things will fall apart (or branch off) very quickly. It might take more effort initially, but the value and benefits are long-lasting and wide-reaching.

Finally, the solution, software and architecture must be part of an ecosystem. There are dozens of major healthcare and life science organizations worldwide — international initiatives, top cancer centers, genome centers and large pharma and biotech companies, that have adopted our solutions and reference architecture. One benefit they started to realize is collaboration and sharing based on common architecture. For example, a research hospital can develop a cancer genomics pipeline and share it with another institution quickly either by sending the XML-based script or publishing it in a cloud-based portal like an application store. We have also started to see early examples of data sharing using metadata and RESTful APIs. Based on this approach, parallel communities or consortium are being formed for digital medical imaging, translational research and big data analytics. This makes parallel discovery possible.

Q: It can all sound a bit overwhelming. What do you say to the skeptics who say the hurdles in our current healthcare system are too big for us to expect the reality of precision medicine anytime soon?

A: We’re on a long journey. We’ve been focused on understanding the structure and biology of the human genome. In the grand scale we’ve largely accomplished that in a remarkably short period of time.

We are now focused on understanding the biology of disease in order to ultimately advance the science of medicine and improve the effectiveness of healthcare. While the hurdles are significant, the pace is accelerating and there is no turning back on the journey. It is essential that healthcare researchers, providers, technologists and data scientists begin building a strong foundation now for turning all this data into practical insights or risk being left behind.

Call to the Health Care Community to Execute on Next Steps for a Wider Adoption and Implementation of Precision Medicine

The recent Facebook data breach, genetic data sleuthing by the FBI that led to the Golden State Killer, and the soon-to-be-implemented European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), has put data privacy and security front and center.

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Data Privacy, the Security, And Ownership

The recent Facebook data breach, genetic data sleuthing by the FBI that led to the Golden State Killer, and the soon-to-be-implemented European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), has put data privacy and security front and center.

Read More

Q&A with Jason Crites from IBM & Piers Nash from Health2047 Speaking at PMWC 2018 Michigan in June

Q: What need is IBM and Health2047 addressing in the healthcare/life sciences sector?

Jason (IBM): The industry is undergoing a significant transformation as reimbursement shifts from fee-for-service to value-based outcomes in the face of regulatory uncertainty.

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Dr. Francis Collins of NIH at June PMWC Michigan- Launch of Nationwide Participation Enrollment!

This past Sunday—May 6, 2018—the program reached a major milestone with the start of the nationwide participation enrollment! The All of Us Research Program, part of the Precision Medicine Initiative that was famously announced by President Barack Obama at the 2015 State of the Union address, aims to enroll a total of 1 million Americans.

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Meet Dr. Gil Omenn, Director of the University of Michigan Center for Computational Medicine & Bioinformatics on June 6th at PMWC 2018 Michigan

Q: What are the objectives of the Human Proteome Project and what are some of the recent breakthrough discoveries?

The HUPO Human Proteome Project has two overarching goals: (1) to complete the protein parts list, with at least one protein product from each of the ~20,000 protein-coding genes along with sequence variants, splice variants, and post-translational modifications, with characterization of their functions;…

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Meet Amir Dan Rubin, CEO of One Medical on June 6th at PMWC 2018 Michigan

Q: What are some of the biggest contributors to these challenges and how can we overcome them?

A: One of the underlying challenges driving the rising the cost of health care is that most of the health system’s stakeholders have few incentives, if not outright disincentives, to manage expenditures.

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Interview with Steve Nelson, CEO, UnitedHealthcare Presenting at PMWC 2018 Michigan in June

Q: What’s the biggest misconception about UnitedHealthcare?

That we don’t care, that we’re just a health insurance company that pays or denies medical claims. In reality, helping people is at the core of what we do every day.

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Emerging Technologies are Disrupting Healthcare | PMWC Michigan June 6-7

We had the chance to sit down with Dr. Topol to hear his thoughts on big data, digital health, sensors, and artificial intelligence, some of the newest precision medicine technologies.

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Interview with Dan Rhodes from Strata Oncology

Q: What need is Strata Oncology addressing?

Despite substantial advances in precision oncology, the majority of advanced cancer patients still do not benefit from comprehensive tumor molecular profiling or precision therapy trials.

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Interview with Lisa McLaughlin from Workit Health

Q: What need is Workit Health addressing?

Drug overdoses killed more Americans last year than were lost during the entire Vietnam War (69,000).

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Interview with Olivier Elemento from Weill Cornell Medicine

Q: What research are you or your lab focusing on and why, and what problem(s) are you trying to solve?

I direct the Englander Institute for Precision Medicine, an Institute that focuses on using genomics and informatics to make medicine more individualized.

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Interview with Dr. Dunnenberger from NorthShore University HealthSystem

Q: What patient population is NorthShore University HealthSystem serving and which services are you specializing in?

NorthShore is a four hospital community health system with over 100 outpatient medical offices.

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How Artificial Intelligence (AI) Will Potentiate Individualized Medicine, Q&A with Eric Topol

We had the chance to sit down with Dr. Topol to hear his thoughts on big data, digital health, sensors, and artificial intelligence, some of the newest precision medicine technologies.

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Interview with Jennifer Kloke from Ayasdi

Q: What need is Ayasdi addressing?

Ayasdi is pioneering the application of AI to value-based care by targeting two of the most complex problems in healthcare: population risk stratification and clinical variation management.

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Q&A with Eric Topol, Executive Vice President, Scripps Research Institute

Dr. Eric Topol, voted by Modern Healthcare as the most influential physician executive in the United States, shared his thoughts on why people should own and control their own data.

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University of Michigan

The Precision Medicine World Conference (PMWC), held annually in Silicon Valley, is coming back to North Carolina for its 2nd Conference back at Duke University on September 24-25, 2018.

PMWC 2018 Duke, the 15th installment of the conference, will spotlight the explosion of biomedical technologies, driving initiatives that enable the translation of precision medicine into direct improvements in health care.

 

  • Track 1 will showcase sessions on the latest advancements in precision medicine which include, but are not limited to:
    • Digital Phenotyping
    • Precision Public Health
    • Pharmacogenomics
    • The Microbiome
    • Rare Disease Diagnosis
    • Digital Health/Health and Wellness
    • Early Days of Life Sequencing
    • Diversity in Precision Medicine
    • Resilience
    • AI and Machine Learning
    • Gene Editing
    • Large Scale Bio-data Resources to Support Drug Development (PPPs)
    • Point-of Care Dx Platform
    • FDA Efforts to Accelerate PM
    • Implementation into Health Care Delivery
    • Next Gen. Workforce of PM
    • Immunotherapy
    • Robust Clinical Decision Support Tools
    • Creating Clinical Value with Liquid Biopsy ctDNA, etc.
    • Neoantigens
    • Emerging Technologies In PM

The Precision Medicine World Conference (PMWC), held annually in Silicon Valley, is coming back to North Carolina for its 2nd Conference back at Duke University on September 24-25, 2018.

PMWC 2018 Duke, the 15th installment of the conference, will spotlight the explosion of biomedical technologies, driving initiatives that enable the translation of precision medicine into direct improvements in health care.

 

    • Track 1 will showcase sessions on the latest advancements in precision medicine which include, but are not limited to:
      • Digital Phenotyping
      • Precision Public Health
      • Pharmacogenomics
      • The Microbiome
      • Rare Disease Diagnosis
      • Digital Health/Health and Wellness
      • Early Days of Life Sequencing
      • Diversity in Precision Medicine
      • Resilience
      • AI and Machine Learning
      • Gene Editing
      • Large Scale Bio-data Resources
        to Support Drug Development (PPPs)
      • Point-of Care Dx Platform
      • FDA Efforts to Accelerate PM
      • Implementation into Health Care Delivery
      • Next Gen. Workforce of PM
      • Immunotherapy
      • Robust Clinical Decision Support Tools
      • Creating Clinical Value with Liquid Biopsy
        ctDNA, etc.
      • Neoantigens
      • Emerging Technologies In PM
  • Track 2- PMWC 2018 Duke Showcase, will enable 15-minute company presentations on latest novel technologies. Apply to present here.
big data diagnostics session

Clinical Dx Showcase

crispr showcase

Emerging Therapeutics Showcase

NGS Showcase

Genomic Profiling Showcase

AI Showcase Session Image

AI and Data Sciences Showcase

  • Luminary and Pioneer Awards, honoring individuals who contributed, and continue to contribute, to the field of Precision Medicine
  • 500+ multidisciplinary attendees, from across the entire spectrum of healthcare, representing different types of companies, technologies, and medical centers with leadership roles in precision medicine

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